Is It True That Tai Chi Slows Aging?

By on 05/26/2015
tai chi slows aging

Tai Chi Slows Aging

One of the best anti aging technique that also helps to retain the same strong youthful body is the practice of Tai chi.  Tai chi is an ancient type of martial art that originated from china.  Studies carried out to establish how tai chi slows aging revealed that the practice raises the number of the CD34 cells. These are the stem cells that are responsible of the major body functions and structures.

Researchers have also conducted numerous studies on young volunteers in the evaluation of the life-lengthening effects of the practice.  The study was conducted on three groups with each group taking a different activity including  tai chi, walking briskly and little or no exercise. The Study involved volunteers below the age of 25 and it took a year to compare the anti-aging and rejuvenating effect of tai chi to the volunteer in every group. Those who engaged in the tai chi practice recorded a higher number of the CD34 cells, unlike those in the other two groups.

tai chi slows agingOne of the main reasons why the study was specifically done on young volunteers is due to their higher abilities to renew cells than the elderly.  There are also fewer interfering factors in the study involving young people unlike a study involving older volunteers.  A study involving older people is likely to be faced with numerous interfering factors such as use of medication or even some health conditions such as chronic diseases.  These studies have confirmed that tai chi has numerous health benefits.  The practice helped to treat many patients suffering from numerous ailments including fibromyalgia and Parkinson’s disease, both moderate and mild.  It also proved to be of great help in improving body balance, reducing stress as well as blood pressure.

In regards to the life-lengthening effect of tai chi these have provided scientific evidence of its numerous health benefits.  According to the researchers involved, the studies have also revealed the varying levels of impacts that will mainly be influenced by the difference in ages as well as different populations. There are many more studies that are being carried out to link tai chi with healing properties. Another recent study conducted in 2012 observed that the practice can also help boost one’s memory.  Elderly people gave a better performance in a memory test given after practicing tai chi for duration of eight months, three times a week.

Tai chi was developed in china about 2000 years ago and mainly involves performance of a series of movements that are normally done in a focused and slow motion. This martial art style also emphasizes on deep breathing which helps to improve the performance of major internal organs. One of the main reasons why tai chi is gaining popularity especially with the elderly is because when done correctly, the practice does not put a lot of strain on your joints and muscles.  Tai Chi practice also has a lower impact than other forms as exercise, making it appropriate for all levels of fitness and ages.

Tai chi is even more appealing as it involves no special equipment and can be done anywhere, in a group or even alone.  However as all recommendations for starting a new exercise routine, we recommend you consult your doctor before beginning the practice especially if suffering from any health condition such as fractures, back pains, severe osteoporosis or even pregnancy.

 

 

 

Resources:

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/29/tai-chi-health-benefits_n_5410470.html

 

Tai Chi aging: Chinese martial art slows aging? Study finds new health benefits
Examiner.com, on Thu, 29 May 2014 20:42:35 -0700
Tai Chi and aging may have a greater connection than once thought, thanks to a breakthrough study conducted by health experts and recently published in a scientific magazine, Cell Transplantation. The new study has revealed this week that the

 

 

 


 

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